The Debate: Hard Work V.S Talent

For many years, the topic of talent versus hard work is a common issue in debates all around the world. This topic has been discussed by people of all professions throughout history. It can be a very controversial topic because the difference between one’s innate ability versus the ability affected by personal experiences.

Hard Work V.S Talent

Hard work has always been stressed as the key to success in life. The message that has been drilled in our head since birth work you will ace the test; work hard to make the team; work hard to get the promotion. Hard work is noted as the very foundation on which the U.S was built, the motivation of average people propelling them ahead in life. Talent, on the other hand, is not something which can be gained. Talent is concrete either it is present or not and is mostly determined by a number of uncontrollable factors. Even within a family structure there may be differences between siblings one child may not be very athletic while the other seems to succeed in sport with ease. It is widely believed that the likelihood of becoming exceptionally competent in certain fields depends upon the presence or absence of inborn attributes variously labelled “talents” or “gifts”.

Reality Of Talent

However, the verdict of someone being naturally talented is often skewed. For example, when we see a person who is extremely successful in the very thing we want to achieve, we often conclude that he or she must be really talented. We come to this conclusion because we’re judging the end result – the success they achieve itself. Most times we tend to forget about the process and the journey of getting there. Majority of successful people have been working at their particular craft for many years and have dedicated time, effort and their lives to accomplish their ultimate goals. Gifted people are perceived as complacent and lazy; while non-gifted people work harder to make up for it. In reality, talent can only carry you so far, the rest is hard work. The two are not mutually exclusive. I tend to believe tenacity itself is a form of natural talent. It’s not something everyone is capable of. Being able to work hard towards a goal, consistently, despite hardship, is a gift. It’s easy to judge talent by a painting, photo, music score or fan base because they’re more conceivable. Another factor that’s often ignored in such discussions is Passion. Passion makes us strive for excellence. Talent + hard work + passion are a winning formula for success.

Which Is More Important To You

With consideration to success in life, there are certain qualities that can hold greater value than talent alone, which are desire, persistence and hard work. Of course, it is not impossible for a person with normal intelligence to learn to develop a certain attribute or accomplish an activity with sufficient and regular practice. And while having natural talent is good, it can still prevent someone to achieve something. What is the lesson here? Which is more important hard work or talent? Comment your answers below and if you like this post please share!

Copyright ©2016 Jay Colby All Rights Reserved.

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About Jay Colby

Some would categorize me as an entrepreneur, life coach, son, friend and all of the above. I’m just another person trying to find my way in this world. Until recently, I was unsure what my path in this life would consist of. Like many others I was between I know what I want to do but not sure if that’s what I’m supposed to do. I am currently finishing my degree in something that has nothing to do with becoming a writer or entrepreneur so automatically it qualifies me to become one right! Follow me as I go through this journey called life to impact and encourage one person at a time.
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85 Responses to The Debate: Hard Work V.S Talent

  1. Benn Bell says:

    Talent is a necessary ingredient to success but it needs to be backed up with hard work, determination, and persistence. Having an iron will and indomitable spirit helps out as well..

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Talent is good but not enough to become successful. Talent needs hardworking to sharpen it and make more waves. I have seen people who don’t push themselves to go that extra mile simply because they are gifted at something. The reality of their lives is that those who aren’t as talented but are willing to learn and harness the little they have end up getting bigger opportunities. So talent is never enough.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Everyone has a talent for something. We should make the most of our own personal talent but also work hard. Good post, Jay. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  4. kage2015 says:

    Some may have a natural talent but they still must work to keep that talent up or to improve. Hard work I believe will always win out.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Alexa Brooks says:

    Hard work always pays off, at least that is how I have always lived my life.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. caendicott says:

    Hard work. Talent will only get you so far, because so many people rely on that and nothing else to get them through. Also, along a similar not, years of experience can more just as much, if not more, than a degree. I’ve seen that in my own department. A degreed librarian I work with isn’t worth her degree compared to my non-degreed Library Services tech.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. boozilla says:

    I really like your analysis! I also think luck plays a huge part in success….and who you know or are related to is also, still and unfortunately, a big piece of it in many areas of endeavor.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s a difficult comparison to make. In some cases, the specifics involved are important. But mostly both of them are needed to some extent. There are those with absolutely no talent for something, say playing basketball. With work, they might get less horrible, but without any talent at all, they are never going to excel. Me, I have no sense of rhythm. Which means I can’t follow a beat so I don’t dance particularly well. Similarly, with singing, I can’t hear when I’m singing the wrong notes. Others hear it, but I don’t. I can work hard at it, but it is unlikely that is going to improve to any appreciable extent. It simply ‘is’. On the other hand, there are things people struggle to do, because they don’t know how or haven’t yet developed the muscle coordination to move in certain ways, but if they’re willing to work, they will get better, possibly even very good. Talent, innate talent, may make it easier to develop a skill, but it will still need to be developed. Most painters didn’t create masterpieces the first time they put a brush to page. Most writers didn’t create perfect novels in one single sitting on the first try.

    And, as someone else mentioned, sometimes ‘success’ with a talent, innate or developed solely through hard work, depends on outside factors – opportunities, people you know, circumstances in life, choices you are faced with along the way.

    A talent can go undeveloped and be wasted, but hard work can get you good enough at something to succeed. You’re right that you can’t look at someone else’s finished product in order to evaluate yourself. But if you really want something, your best shot at it is with hard work. Unless it’s something incredibly specialized, most things can be learned if you’re willing to put in the time.

    Good post! (even nearly a year later!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jay Colby says:

      Great insight you’ve shared. I agree with innate talent can make it easier to learn a skill. But it still has to worked on to be great at the particular skill. Thanks for sharing!

      Like

  9. We have to set goals to work toward. We can then use our talent and hard work to reach them. Good post, Jay. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  10. YellowCable says:

    I think talent is a good base if one has it to begin with. I believe passion, motivated, persistent and enduring hardship are the formula to success. This reminds me of a Nobel prize physicist who denied that he was a genius. He just said he was just crazy about solving problems rather.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Reblogged this on Daily Voice Of Reason; and commented:
    Hard Work vs. Talent, something I have recently been questioning myself…

    Liked by 1 person

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